6 Dishes You NEED to Try when in Sardinia
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6 Dishes You NEED to Try when in Sardinia

In Sardinia, perhaps in many parts of Italy, food and wine are very important because they are linked to holy holidays, parties and being together with family or with friends. When visiting each country or city, the cuisine of the locality holds a special place in the heart of all the tourists. That is why we, at Ichnusa Bikes, present to you the 6 dishes that we believe will capture your hearts and captivate your taste buds. And we start with:

Pane Carasau

Pane Carasau

Pane Carasau is a thin, crisp flat bread seasoned with salt and rosemary, made in Sardinia, Italy. The bread was made for shepherds who would remain in the countryside for months consuming it with sheep or goats cheese. Pane Carasau is also the base for many other Sardinian dishes. and eaten in many different ways.

'Pane Guttiau' is an excellent antipasto and really good with Sardinian sausages and sweet green olives. Pour olive oil generously over 'pane carasau' and then place immediately into a super hot oven for a few minutes. The bread should blow up like a balloon and be split in two to eat.

Malloreddus

Malloreddus

Malloreddus alla Campidanese can only be found on the Italian island, making it the quintessential pasta dish of Sardinia – and the one dish every visitor must try. Also called gnocchetti Sardi or ‘little Sardinian gnocchi’ after their dumpling-like shape, malloreddus are made from durum wheat flour, water, salt and—a very Sardinian touch—a pinch of ground saffron. Malloreddus has a distinctive shape and pattern, traditionally made by women rolling the little shells of pasta against wicker and reed baskets that adorned every home. It is a national dish that just NEEDS to be tried out.

Culurgiones

Culurgiones

Culurgiones translates directly to “little bundles” in English. Culurgiones is a traditional dish of Ogliastra, a region situated in Sardinia. These are Sardinian stuffed pockets with 2-4 inches in length and 1-2 inches of width. The dough is made from semolina flour, white flour, eggs, water and salt giving a soft crust to the ravioli. This dish is a speciality for festive days such as All Souls Day and Carnival!

The appearance of Culurgiones has a striking similarity with the shape of wheat grain as it is believed to appease the new crop in August. They are even considered to be the talisman that safeguards family deprivation.

Fregola

Fregola

Fregola is a pasta variety produced in the island of Sardinia, made of small oven-baked, hand-rolled durum wheat semolina balls. Due to its similarity with cous cous, fregola pasta is considered the Italian or Sardinian equivalent of the popular North African dish.

This exquisite dish has very ancient origins (it seems that it was produced and exported as early as the 10th century) and it owes its name to the Latin term ” ferculum ” which, associated with the verbs crumble, fragment and graze, can be translated with the word “crumb“. These little grains can be enjoyed in a variety of ways, but the most well-known recipe is with tomatoes and a variety of mussels known as arselle.

They definitely go best with fish, seafood, or soups.

Pecorino Sardo

Pecorino Sardo

A firm sheep's milk cheese from Sardinia, Pecorino Sardo is richer and less biting and salty than its more famous cousin, Pecorino Romano. Pecorino sardo is an uncooked hard cheese made from fresh whole sheep's milk curdled using lamb or kid rennet. The mixture is poured into moulds that will give the cheese its characteristic shape. After a brief period in brine, the moulds are lightly smoked and left to ripen in cool cellars in central Sardinia.

It goes beautifully with fresh vegetables, arbutus honey and many traditional Sardinian wines, like Cannonau and Vermentino. Less aged Pecorino pairs well with young red wines while matured version could be served with a glass of sparkling wine.

Seadas

sebada

One of the yummiest sweet treats in Sardina is the sebada (or seada), generally referred to in its plural form—sebadas or seadas. probably best known in Sardinia, it is made with semolina, pecorino cheese, honey and sugar giving a piquant flavour. The pastries are deep fried and drizzled with honey and served hot. This combination of sweet and savoury is not to be missed.

Seada was originally served as an entree, however over time it turned slowly into a dessert\ It goes well with white and aromatic sweet wines such as Malvasia di Bosa DOC, and Vermentino di Gallura DOCG wines.

How Ichnusa Bikes Make Sure everyone has the best Cuisine experience.

If you are a vegetarian, no problem, we can incorporate that choice in your tour..  To offer you the best service, you must report any food requirements during the booking and not on arrival. The Mediterranean diet is already partly vegetarian or vegan and it is not difficult to get a good vegan / vegetarian menu. Some of us are vegans and since 2003, and we at ichnusa Bike have already fully met the food needs of guests with special diets.

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